III:7

III:7

Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

 

“Never value anything as profitable that compels you to break your promise, to lose your self-respect, to desire anything that needs walls and curtains:  for he who has preferred to everything else his own intelligence and daimon and the worship of its excellence, acts no tragic part, does not groan, will not need either solitude or much company; and what is chief of all, he will live without pursuing or flying from death; but whether for a longer or a shorter time he shall have the soul enclosed in the body, he cares not at all:  for even if he must depart immediately, he will go as readily as if he were going to do anything else that can be done with decency and order; taking  care of this only all through life, that his thoughts abide with the concerns of an intelligent animal and a member of a civil community.”

 

From the Dover Thrift Edition:  “Meditations,” Marcus Aurelius (Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, NY), ISBN 0-486-29823-X.  Unabridged, modernized Dover (1997) republication of the George Long translation.  New Introduction. Publisher’s Note. 112pp.

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II:7

II:7

Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

“Do the external things that fall upon you distract you? Give yourself time to learn something new and good, and cease to be whirled around….”

From the Dover Thrift Edition:  “Meditations,” Marcus Aurelius (Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, NY), ISBN 0-486-29823-X.  Unabridged, modernized Dover (1997) republication of the George Long translation.  New Introduction. Publisher’s Note. 112pp.

VI:6

VI:6

Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

“The best way of avenging yourself is not to become like the wrongdoer.”

From the Dover Thrift Edition:  “Meditations,” Marcus Aurelius (Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, NY), ISBN 0-486-29823-X.  Unabridged, modernized Dover (1997) republication of the George Long translation.  New Introduction. Publisher’s Note. 112pp.

VII:6

VII:6

Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

 

“How many, after being celebrated by fame, have been given up to oblivion; and how many who have celebrated the fame of others have long been dead.”

 

From the Dover Thrift Edition:  “Meditations,” Marcus Aurelius (Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, NY), ISBN 0-486-29823-X.  Unabridged, modernized Dover (1997) republication of the George Long translation.  New Introduction. Publisher’s Note. 112pp.

IV:25

IV:25

Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

“See how the life of the good man suits you, the life of him who is satisfied with his portion of the whole, and satisfied with his own just acts and benevolent disposition.”

From the Dover Thrift Edition:  “Meditations,” Marcus Aurelius (Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, NY), ISBN 0-486-29823-X.  Unabridged, modernized Dover (1997) republication of the George Long translation.  New Introduction. Publisher’s Note. 112pp.

V:20

V:20

Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

“In one respect man is the nearest thing to me, so far as I must do good to men and endure them.  But so far as some men make themselves obstacles to my proper acts, man becomes to me one of the things that are indifferent, no less than the sun or wind or a wild beast.  Not it is true that these may impede my action, but they are no impediments to my affects and disposition, which have the power of acting conditionally and changing….”

From the Dover Thrift Edition:  “Meditations,” Marcus Aurelius (Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, NY), ISBN 0-486-29823-X.  Unabridged, modernized Dover (1997) republication of the George Long translation.  New Introduction. Publisher’s Note. 112pp.

VIII:16

VIII:16

Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

“Remember that to change your opinion and to follow him who corrects your error is as consistent with freedom as it is to persist in your own error.  For it is your own activity, which is exerted according to your own movement and judgement, and indeed according to your own understanding, too.”

From the Dover Thrift Edition:  “Meditations,” Marcus Aurelius (Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, NY), ISBN 0-486-29823-X.  Unabridged, modernized Dover (1997) republication of the George Long translation.  New Introduction. Publisher’s Note. 112pp.